Features — 29 July 2013

Murray garners recognition from the Chronicle for Higher Education in two faculty areas

The Chronicle of Higher Education’s latest survey has found Murray State University to be one of the top universities in the nation for a career for faculty. This is Murray’s fourth time to be recognized as one of the Chronicle’s “Great Colleges to Work For.”

Murray State University is recognized for excellence in two categories in 2013 — Teaching Environment and Tenure Clarity and Process

Nearly 47,000 surveys were completed by administrators, faculty members and professional support staff members at 300 institutions. Murray State was one of only 97 institutions recognized as a 2013 Great College to Work For.

Once again, Murray State is the only Kentucky public university to be noted on the list. Also on the list from Kentucky is private school Somerset Community College.

“We are pleased that our employees rank Murray State so well as to be designated a Great College to Work For. Our employees are truly concerned about each other and promote an environment that is conducive to providing exceptional educational and service experiences for our students,” said Dr. Tim Miller, interim president of Murray State University.

“I am pleased that the two areas MSU is noted for are in academic affairs. We take great pride in our teaching environment; we have been known for quality instruction since 1922. Also, the strength noted in our tenure process is directly attributed to the overall strength and commitment of our faculty,” Dr. Jay Morgan, MSU provost and vice president for academic affairs, noted. “Our faculty oftentimes make life-long commitments to MSU, our mission and our students, and they are the foundation that makes our reputation great.”

MSU is among the 35 colleges and universities across the country to be honored in the “large” category, defined by enrollments of 10,000 or more students. Recognized schools joining Murray State on this list include Stanford and Baylor.

To administer the survey and analyze the results, The Chronicle used ModernThink, a strategic human capital consulting firm that has conducted numerous “Best Places to Work” programs, surveying hundreds of thousands of employees nationwide. The Great Colleges survey included a two-part assessment process — the survey administered to faculty, administrators and professional support staff and an institutional audit that captured demographics and workplace policies and practices from each institution. The primary factor in deciding whether an institution received a Great College to Work For recognition was the employee feedback.

“It’s easier to be a great workplace during good times, but it’s when times are tough that the commitment to workplace quality really gets tested. And those institutions that measure up during times of economic hardship reinforce their already strong cultures and put even more distance between them and their peer institutions for whom they compete for talent,” Richard K. Boyer, principal and managing partner at ModernThink, said.


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